Cultural Holidays for Kids

With the longer nights drawing in and the colder weather starting to creep up on us all, I’ve been giving a lot of thought to getting away with the family to somewhere special. Of course, you might already know that there are some ideal elements in any holiday that I’m always going to favour, but the more I’ve thought about this, the more I’ve come to realise that it’s the culture of where I’m going that matters just as much as the place that I’m visiting.

I want my children to get fully immersed in the cultural elements of where we travel together, and it’s led me to look into exciting hotspots all over the globe. Here are a few that have caught my interest, although I’d love to hear your own recommendations too.

Florence, Italy

Known locally as Firenze, Florence makes for a fantastic city break. It’s here that the Renaissance was born, or at least nurtured into the mainstream culture of Europe. Back before Italy was a unified country, Florence was a powerfully influential region, it seems, and today that legacy stands up in its gorgeous architecture.

Il Duomo, the massive dome and its towers in the heart of the city, is something no photographs can do justice, and similarly, the Ponte Veggio bridge and the shops it houses is like something out of a fairytale. The kids are sure to love all this stuff, and even if the culture doesn’t quite inspire them (even the daring inventions and art of da Vinci, no less), the gelato in its countless flavours probably will.

Sardinia

This was a nice surprise for me, as it turns out that Sardinia is more diverse from mainland Italy than I thought… enough so that I felt it worth a mention of its own here. While there are plenty of reasons why a family would want to visit, it’s the culture and folklore that really drew my eye.

Mysterious ancient sites like the Necropolis of Anghelu Ruju are one thing, but it’s also the local stories they tell, like the mysterious Accabadora in black, or the upbeat Easter festivities that are sure to get the kids’ minds off chocolate.

Havana, Cuba

Jetting off for some Caribbean sun definitely sounds like just the ticket about now. Yet perhaps the most vibrant of all the archipelago’s cities is Havana, the capital of Cuba, where the classic Spanish-styled buildings mix with bombastic street parties and, of course, those classic cars.

Those, along with horse and carriage rides through Havana’s old town, are guaranteed to light up kids’ faces while also showcasing the distinctive history of this individualistic island nation. I was surprised when reading up just how many family activities exist in Havana that they take their ice cream incredibly seriously in Havana too.

Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

It’s not just us mums who love tapas, as kids love a big table full of little bites to eat. Barcelona is brilliant in that regard, and it’s also cultural enough to really turn little heads, thanks to some of its unique architecture. The wiggly, mosaic-encrusted buildings designed by Antoni Gaudi and his contemporaries are bound to raise some smiles, as will more medieval sites the Castle of Torre Baro. In fact, Torre Baro itself is a hill offering amazing views, which I’m looking forward to conquering with some brave little hikers in tow.

Crete, Greece

As one of the largest of the Greek islands, it makes sense that Crete has tons to offer. I’m a big fan of the beaches, of course, but the island also houses ruins that tell the tales of the of the earliest civilisations in all of Europe. The hands-on exhibitions at Crete’s Natural History Museum are a must-see with kids.

More contemporary Greek history is also easily enjoyed here of course, like the old town district of Chania. There’s also plenty to be said for Spinalonga Island, a little island just off Crete where budding young explorers can get stuck into a strip of shore more or less untouched by mainstream tourism. Certainly works for me!

The more I think, the more ideas seem to pop up for good cultural breaks with the kids. Have you any of your own to share?

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Cultural Holidays For Kids

 

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10 Comments

  1. November 7, 2017 / 11:41 am

    There are so many lovely destinations here! I visited Barcelona lots when I was kid and I’ve always loved it, I used to love looking at all the buildings! Greece and Florence are still on my travel wishlist!

  2. November 7, 2017 / 12:17 pm

    Oh how I would love to visit any of these right now! I have been to Greece before and really liked it. My parents have been to cuba and it looked incredible x

  3. November 7, 2017 / 8:17 pm

    Lots of great idea’s here! I have to admit we haven’t really been on any cultural holidays and have yet to holiday outside of the UK it is definitely something I would consider when they are slightly older though and able to take it all in!

  4. November 7, 2017 / 11:02 pm

    I love places which have plenty of things to offer and these cultural holidays are as suitable for adults as they are for kids! When would be the best time of the year to explore Cuba, Ali?

  5. November 8, 2017 / 10:27 am

    We’re off to Venice next year with the kids which I’m really looking forward too – it makes a nice change to be able to do something ‘grown up’ with the kids.

  6. November 8, 2017 / 12:09 pm

    We only took our kids abroad for the first time a couple of years ago and they loved it. if you can make it work then I think it is amazing to exposure your kids to all different cultures. Mich x

  7. November 9, 2017 / 7:59 am

    I think cultural holidays are really important and would prefer to budget for these rather than theme park type holidays. Our first stop is going to be Paris.

  8. thenafranssen
    November 14, 2017 / 9:45 am

    Wow, this looks beautiful! What a fun way to spend a holiday. I would love to try something like this.

  9. November 21, 2017 / 12:55 pm

    This looks just beautiful and I do love a destination where the kids can learn something as well as have an amazing time.

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